Top 7 Books for Halloween 🦇

The most mysterious holiday is almost here, and you still aren’t excited for it? Then this post is for you!

Halloween is the perfect day for everyone, who, like me, loves everything magical, mysterious and supernatural. It’s the time of the year, when you can decorate your place with spooky decor, have a marathon of dark movies, or enjoy a thriller book on a rainy evening.

I’m not the biggest fan of horror stories, but I do love some tension, suspense and gloomy atmosphere, especially around this time of the year. Hence why most of the books that I’ve picked for this list aren’t too scary. So, if you’re looking for the perfect read for Halloween, you may find something interesting in here.

1. Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights

For me, gothic literature is equal to Halloween style, cause there’s always a feeling of mystery in there. If you love an old period love story with some tragedy, then this one’s for you. There are the dark moors, constantly covered in thick fog, antique castle with a feeling of ghost, crawling wind and everything that will definitely make your ordinary evening feel mysterious.

2. Bram Stoker – Dracula

The most famous vampire, who left a huge legacy on literature and cinematography. To be honest, I wish I liked it better than I did, because I wanted to see more of Dracula and less of everyone else getting ready for his arrival. But one thing I can say for sure: it truly felt creepy and even scary, so it’s a great choice for this time of the year. I wrote a whole big article about Dracula, its plot, influence and inspiration, so if you’re interested in vampire literature you can check it out.

3. Agatha Christie – The Halloween Party

This one is perfect for those, who don’t want any mysterious or supernatural elements in a book, but still fancy some Halloween mood. Agatha doesn’t disappoint, especially if her stories include the famous Poirot. Christie’s detectives are always very interesting to read, keeping the suspense and tension until the very end. Can’t say anything else, because it will feel like spoilers.

4. Ann Radcliffe – Mysteries of Udolpho

Radcliffe is one of my favorite authors, as she’s the queen of gothic genre, literally. Her most famous work is “Mysteries of Udolpho“, and it is truly a masterpiece with all the descriptions of nature, strong plot, many peculiar characters, and, of course, the presence of supernatural. Even towards the very end of the story you are not sure, whether there’s actually happening something paranormal, or is just an imagination and illusions of the characters.

5. Ray Bradbury – The Halloween Tree

As the name suggests, the events of the story happen on Halloween, as the characters get to visit the most magical and diverse places existing. Bradbury is a genius when it comes to transferring the mood and atmosphere of anything, and “The Halloween tree” is no exception. I also recommend reading “Something Wicked This Way Comes“. It isn’t about Halloween, if I remember correctly, but is also a fantasy, with weird and dark stuff going on in a little town and carnival.

6. Horace Walpole – Castle of Otranto

This one is actually the scariest one from the list. I got this book when I was 14, started reading it at night and was so scared, that hid it away for years. Later, when I started reading, I was more prepared and actually enjoyed the creepy atmosphere. It is full of elements of horror, with an old castle with vindictive ghosts, old myths and legends that come true. So, if you’re a fan of thrillers, I’ll definitely recommend this one.

7. Mary Shelley – Frenkenstein

I never thought “Frankenstein” was horrible or terrifying, to be honest. It was really interesting to discover the life of Frankenstein himself or his famous monster, that became another important symbol of fantasy genre and Halloween. As you go with the plot, you feel compassionate and sorry for the unhappy monster, who couldn’t find his place in this world.

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